Problems

A report titled “The Architecture of Segregation: Civil Unrest, the Concentration of Poverty, and Public Policy” sets in motion a serious discussion about job opportunities for blacks and Hispanics in a city ranked No. 1 for concentrated poverty. Download Full Report  What the report tells us:
  • More than one in four of the black poor and nearly one in six of the Hispanic poor lives in a neighborhood of extreme poverty, compared to one in 13 of the white poor
  • Poor children are more likely to reside in high-poverty neighborhoods than poor adults
  • Fastest growth in black concentration of poverty (12.6 percentage points) since 2000 was not in the largest cities, but in metropolitan areas with 500,000 to 1 million people
A number of factors contribute to the unemployment and poverty in Syracuse.  This project explores the stories of some of the barriers people face in getting jobs.

At a glance: 8 key points from Paul Jargowsky’s research

Here are 8 key takeaways from “The Architecture of Segregation: Civil Unrest, the Concentration of Poverty, and Public Policy,” by Paul Jargowsky. Read More

Syracuse policy decisions in 3 key areas problematic for community members

Organizations are seeking to rid Syracuse of its No. 1 ranking in concentrated poverty through policy changes on jobs, wages and city and county consolidation. Read More

Criminal history can hinder job searches

Criminal history and jail time is often a major barrier to getting a job, but Syracuse and many other cities are moving to fix that. Read More

Addiction in family drives health advocate

Lanika Mabrey, whose parents both contracted HIV from their addiction to drugs, knows from personal experience the problems addiction can pose for people looking for jobs. Read More